Frequent question: How long should mountain bike handlebars be?

The case for an average trail rider to be using a handlebar around 800mm is very unlikely. The best compromise between that extreme length that handlebars have grown to for World Championship downhill racing, and conventional trail riding, appears to be 760mm.

How do I know what size handlebars to get?

  1. If your handlebar is any bigger than 22.2mm then you will need to choose the larger sized bell. …
  2. If your handlebar in the middle looks ‘normal sized’, it’s probably 25.4mm.
  3. If your handlebar looks overly big in the middle, it’s probably 31.8mm.

Is 800mm handlebar too wide?

The short answer is “yes.” The long answer is, well, kinda long. At six-foot-three-inches tall, an 800mm handlebar allows me to get into a super comfortable and stable position while maintaining a posture that is conducive to both shoulder strength and mobility. A perfect world right there.

Why are mountain bike handlebars so wide?

Mountain bikes have wider handlebars because the wider the riders grip is on the handlebars, the easier it is to transfer input from the hands to the wheel. It takes much less power to move a wider handlebar, but at the same time, you have to move the handlebars a lot more to make it go in a certain direction.

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How wide should my bike handlebars be?

They’re probably twice as wide as your hands. If you’re very tall, they don’t make handlebars “wide enough” for you. That’s OK: It’s better to err toward narrow than toward wide. If you have shoulder injuries, I encourage you to try narrower bars.

Are wider handlebars better?

When it comes to mountain bike handlebars, wider is better. They offer you more control, easier breathing and better positioning for balance. This makes you more stable and slower to fatigue. As with any component so intimately related to fit, handlebar width is relative.

Are drop bars comfortable?

Drop bars give you more hand positions, which results in superior palm comfort and they offer an aerodynamic advantage over flat bars, while flat bars are easier to handle and maneuver with for beginners and give a more comfortable, upright riding position.

How does handlebar height affect handling?

Generally speaking, a lower handlebar height reduces your centre of gravity. By placing more weight over the front wheel, you increase traction. … A lower handlebar can also negatively affect handling in steep terrain. On the road, elite riders normally have a significant drop, where their bars sit below the saddle.

How do I choose mountain bike handlebars?

How to choose your MTB handlebar

  1. First make sure that the diameter at the center of the handlebar, where you tighten your stem, is actually 31.8 mm as 95% of the current MTBs are. …
  2. A ‘Riser’, a rise, which is very common in DH, allows to raise your handlebar to rebalance your weight to the rear.
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Should I cut my handlebars?

Don’t be afraid to cut your bars down to get the right width perfect for you. Most handlebars nowadays come very wide and there is plenty of extra room to cut them down to size. Just make sure you are using the right tools.

How do I measure the rise on my mountain bike handlebars?

Rise: Your bars’ rise is measured from the knurled area in the centre of the bottom part of your bars (where the bars clamp into the stem) up to the highest part of the bar ends.

How do I choose rise on handlebars?

Handlebar Rise

Choosing the right amount of rise usually comes down to rider position on the bike. If the cockpit feels too low (for a taller rider, for example), a riser bar can get grips up into a more comfortable position.

How do I choose bike handlebars?

The rule of thumb when selecting the correct handlebar width is to measure the distance between the two bony bits on your shoulders – in more scientific terms the distance between your two acromioclavicular (AC) joints. This measurement gives you a baseline – if it’s 38cm, look for 38cm bars – and so on.

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